Course Information

Courses Offered 
Academic Calendar 
Course Syllabus 
Lecturer Introduction 

Course Syllabus (2016)

Course I: Chinese Language
I. Course Outline (1.5 credits)

Note: 1 class hour equals 45 minutes in this course.

Lecture Topics

Class Hours

Pronunciation/greetings

(你好! !How do you do?)

3

Pronunciation/ Making an inquiry

(你是哪国人Where do you come from?)

3

PronunciationMaking an inquiry

那是你的书吗Is that your book

3

Pronunciation/ Making an inquiry

图书馆在哪儿Where is the library

3

Pronunciation/Location and orientation

在中山大学西边。To the west of SYSU.

3

Pronunciation/Making an inquiry

现在几点What time is it now?

3

Pronunciation/Making an Inquiry

(你的电话号码是多少What is your phone number?

3

Taiji

2

Chinese calligraphy

2

Paper cutting/ Chinese knot

2

Total Class Hours

27

*The actual lectures delivered are subject to change.

II. Course Description

A. Basic Chinese Level I

Basic Chinese Level I is designed to focus on having students master the correct pronunciation and intonation of basic Chinese and grasp the writing of Chinese characters. Elementary Chinese grammar is introduced in this course. It also equips students with the ability to function at a practical-level and to solve simple problems in daily life, including greetings, shopping, bus-taking, flight-taking, etc.

B. Basic Chinese Level II

Basic Chinese Level II is a continuation of Basic Chinese Level I. It continues to introduce Chinese vocabulary and grammar and to equip students with listening, speaking, reading and writing skills on the basis of the previous level. It aims to improve students’ Chinese expressions and reading competence and develop the fundamentals of writing short essays in Chinese.

III. Course Objectives

 

A. The students are expected to master the phonetic system of Chinese, including the sounds, the tones and the intonation;

B. The students are expected to have an understanding of elementary Chinese grammar and Chinese characters. The students will be able to recognize 150 Chinese characters and 150 Chinese phrases and expressions after the course.
IV. Course Learning Outcomes

On completion of this course, students should be able to:

A. Master the pronunciation of Chinese and be familiar with the phonetic system of Chinese;

B. Recognize 150 common Chinese phrases and expression, and master 150 Chinese characters, including the meaning and usage of characters;

C. Conduct daily communication in Chinese, such as greetings, shopping, bus-taking, etc.

V. Course Requirements and Materials

A. Attendance

a. Students should sign-in at every lecture to record their attendance;

b. Students should arrive to class on time and attend all classes; if they need to take a leave of absence from class, they should let the teaching assistant (TA) know in advance and submit a written leave request;

c. Students who are absent from more than 1/4 of the total contact hours  (including requested leaves of absence) will not be allowed to take the final assessment of the course and will not be awarded a certificate of completion at the end of the program.

B. Academic honesty

A student who violates academic integrity will receive an “F” for the course. Violations may include, but is not limited to, one or more of the following acts: cheating, plagiarism, and/or the submission of someone else's work as your own.

C. Course materials:

a. BOYA Chinese

b. Conversational Chinese 301

 VI. Process and Scheme for Assessment

A. Grading formula

Participation

20%

Examination

80%

B. Grading criteria

a. In-class participation (20%)

1. Attendance

2. Participate in class discussions:

1). Answer the instructor’s questions

2). Contribute to the topics

 

b. Examination (80%)

1. Students must take spoken and written examinations at the end of the course;

2. The score of the examination will account for 80% of the final total.


Course II: China Business Studies 

I. Course Outline (Tentative) (1.5 credits)

Notes: A. 1 contact hour equals 1 hour (60 minutes) in this course;

B. 1 class hour equals 45 minutes.

Lecture Topics

Contact Hours

Instructors

Chinese Entrepreneurship (Part 1)

2

Xin ZHENG

Chinese Entrepreneurship (Part 2)

2

Xin ZHENG

Cross-Cultural Encounters

2

Yanmei ZHANG

Effective Communication with Chinese

2

Yanmei ZHANG

Protection of Intellectual Property

2

Henry LIAO

Investment in China

2

Yanming WANG

Doing Business in China

2

Shenjiang MO

Global Strategy-A Chinese Perspective

2

Songhua HU

Company Visit I

3

 

Company Visit II

*The actual lectures delivered are subject to change.

II. Course Description

China Business Studies, designed by Lingnan (University) College, is a special course for international students. It introduces both theoretical and practical knowledge in how Chinese businesses operate in domestic and global markets.

This course will invite senior professors, mostly from the Department of International Business and the Department of Business Management, to lecture on topics such as China’s economy, regional economies, foreign enterprises doing business in China, labor issues, legal environments, and cross-cultural management. It aims to provide students with up-to-date knowledge about business practices in China and to help them understand the basics and standard protocol of interactions with Chinese people in a business environment.

III. Course Objectives

The purpose of this course is to:

A. Introduce China’s business environments from both macro and micro perspectives;

B. Equip students with theoretical and practical knowledge about how to do business in China;

C. Discuss cross-cultural management issues in Chinese business environments.

IV. Course Learning Outcomes (CLOs):

On completion of this course, students should be able to:

A. Possess an extensive understanding about China’s business environments;

B. Demonstrate knowledge of the latest business practices in China;

C. Master the basic tools of analysis, the rules, and the techniques for business decision-making in China;

D. Operate competently in a Chinese corporate environment with effective cross-cultural communication skills.

V. Course Requirements and Materials

A. Attendance

a. Students should sign-in at every lecture to record their attendance;

b. Students should arrive to class on time and remain for the duration; if they need to take a leave of absence from class, they should let the teaching assistant (TA) know in advance and submit a written leave request;

c. Students who are absent from more than 1/4 of the total contact hours  (including requested leaves of absence)  will not be allowed to take the final assessment of the course and will not be awarded a certificate of completion at the end of the program.

B. Academic honesty

A student who violates academic integrity will receive an “F” for the course. Violations may include, but is not limited to, one or more of the following acts: cheating, plagiarism, and/or the submission of someone else's work as your own.

C. Definition of plagiarism and its punishments

Plagiarism is the use of an author’s words or ideas as if they were one’s own without giving credit to the source. A student who plagiarizes will receive a failing grade for the course.

D. Course materials:

a. Textbook(s)-strongly recommended: none

b. Articles-strongly recommended: none

C. The instructors of each lecture will prepare reading materials respectively.

VI. Process and Scheme for Assessment

A. Grading formula

Participation

20%

Research Paper

80%

B. Grading criteria

a. In-class participation (20%)

1. Attendance

2. Participate in class discussions

1). Answer the instructor’s questions

2). Contribute to the topics

 

b. Research Paper (80%)

 

 

1. Students must write a research paper at the end of the course. The paper can be done individually or with a partner;

2. The paper should address an issue of Chinese business. It may be a case study, a study report, or an analytic article;

3. Students can do research by using library resources, the Internet, or conducting personal interviews, questionnaires, surveys, etc.;

4. Students must submit a hard copy and an electronic copy to the International Summer Program (ISP) office before the deadline (the last day the program):

1) Late submission within one week will be accepted but 10 points will be deducted from the final score;

2) Late submission beyond one week after the deadline will be refused;

5. The minimum length is 5 A4-sized pages, double-spaced, and text in a 12 point font, not including tables, appendices, pictures, etc;

6. The paper will be evaluated based on the following standards:

      1) Topic and Theme (20%): Clearly identifies an issue of Chinese business;

      2) Structure (20%): Well organized content with sections and subtitles;

      3) Analysis (30%): Focused discussion with personal perspectives and related theories;

      4) Suggestions (20%): Specific implications of the study and business suggestions;

      5) Language and Format (10%): Proper usage of English and documented sources of data and references;

7. The paper will account for 80% of the final course grade.


Course III: Chinese Politics and Cultural Studies

 I. Course Outline1.5 credits

Notes: A.1 contact hour equals 1 hour (60 minutes) in this course;

B.1 class hour equals 45 minutes.

Lecture Topics

Contact Hours

Instructors

Module 1 Cultural Studies

Chinese Landscape and Scenery

2

Fan DAI

Chinese Dialects

2

Jing ZHAO

Chinese Customs and Festivals

2

Chenguang CHANG

Introduction to Chinese Medicine

2

Dairong

Chinese Opera

2

Xinping CHANG

Module 2 Chinese Politics Studies

Government and Politics in China

2

Zhonghua GUO

Social Policies in China

2

Wing Kit CHAN

Citizenship Practices in Contemporary China: An Introduction to Several Cases of “Rightful Resistance”

2

Ying XIA

Company Visit I

3

 

Company Visit II

*The actual lectures delivered are subject to change.

II. Course Description

This course aims to introduce Chinese government and politics in contemporary China from multiple perspectives and different aspects of Chinese culture. It will cover a broad range of topics, from Social Policies, Urban Management, and Citizenship Practices to Chinese Customs and Festivals, Chinese Landscape, Chinese Medicine, Chinese Opera, and Pop Music, with a focus on the changes in the process of modernization.

III. Course Objectives

The purposes of this course include:

A. Help students understand the Chinese political institutions and government system and analyze the challenges and implications of China’s political, social, and economic development

B. Enable students to have a basic understanding of Chinese thinking and cultural traditions.

IV. Course Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, students should be able to:

A. Demonstrate an extensive understanding of China’s political and social policies

B. Demonstrate knowledge of the origin, development, and approaches of Chinese governance

C. Have a basic understanding of different aspects of Chinese thinking and cultural traditions and understand the changes that are taking place in contemporary China and the impact of modernization on traditional culture.

V. Course Requirements and Materials

A. Attendance

a. Students should sign-in at every lecture to record their attendance;

b. Students should arrive to class on time and remain for the duration; if they need to take a leave of absence from class, they should let the teaching assistant (TA) know in advance and submit a written leave request;

c. Students who are absent from more than 1/4 of the total contact hours  (including requested leaves of absence)  will not be allowed to take the final assessment of the course and will not be awarded a certificate of completion at the end of the program.

B. Academic honesty

A student who violates academic integrity will receive an “F” for the course. Violations may include, but is not limited to, one or more of the following acts: cheating, plagiarism, and/or the submission of someone else's work as your own.

C. Definition of plagiarism and its punishments

Plagiarism is the use of an author’s words or ideas as if they were one’s own without giving credit to the source. A student who plagiarizes will receive a failing grade for the course.

D. Course materials:

a. Textbook(s)-strongly recommended: none

b. Articles-strongly recommended: none

C. The instructors of each lecture will prepare reading materials respectively.

VI. Process and Scheme for Assessment

A. Grading formula

Participation

20%

Paper

80%

B. Grading criteria

a. In-class participation (20%)

1. Attendance

2. Participate in class discussions:

1)Answer the instructor’s questions

2)Contribution to the topics

 b. Paper (80%)
        1. Students must write a research paper at the end of the course. The paper can be done individually or with a partner;
        2. The paper should address an issue of China’s politics or cultural studies, which may be a case study, a study report, or an analytic article

3. Students can use library resources, the Internet, conduct personal interviews, or create a questionnaire, surveys, etc., to complete their research

4. Students must submit a hard copy and an electronic copy to the International Summer Program (ISP) office before the deadline (the last day the program):

1) Late submission within one week will be accepted but 10 points will be deducted from the final score;

2) Late submission beyond one week after the deadline will be refused;

5. The minimum length is 5 A4-sized pages, double-spaced, and text in a 12 point font, not including tables, appendices, pictures, etc;

6The paper will be evaluated based on the following standards:

1)Topic and Theme (20%): Clearly identifies the issue of China’s politics or cultural studies

2)Structure (20%): Well organized content with sections and subtitles;

3)Analysis (30%): Focused discussion with personal perspectives and related theories

4) Suggestions(20%): Specific implications of the study and business suggestions

5)Language and Format (10%): Proper usage of English and documented sources of data and references

7. The paper will account for 80% of the final course grade.

 

Copyright 2010-2014 © Sun Yat-sen University